Thoughts on the 35th challenger anniversary.

I didn’t learn about the space shuttle challenger explosion until 1999.I was 2 and a half when it took place. When I did innitially learn about it, I researched an entire book report on the subject. Of course I did a whole report on the book, but I did additional research as well.
I became interested in space flight the year before, when I watched the shuttle Discovery, carrying John Glenn, who was at the time 77 years old, into space.I believe on one of the evening talk shows, they had an interview with Christa McAuliffe’s mother, and that’s how I found out. The next day I asked a teacher what she knew about what happened. This was my sophomore English teacher. I got an answer that stays with me to this day. She became a teacher because of Christa McAuliffe.
Later in 1999, thanks to my itinerant vision teacher, I got to go to space camp. When I was in the simulated space station, the lady I remember her name was Patricia, who operated the station gave me some material. She told me to roll this rubber-like material into a ball. It was rubber, but it was also like clay, you could form it in your hand and do exactly that with it. Patricia, although I believe we called her Trish for short, and she was a girl friend of our team counselor, then told me this was the exact material that contributed to the Challenger disaster. Well first she asked if I remembered. I was thinking well yeah sort of, I only know now what happened after the fact. I said yes anyway, because by then, I did have a full working memory of what happened. When she told me that the exact material I was holding caused the challenger to explode, I remember thinking I should just get rid of it, but I didn’t and nicely gave it back to her anyway. No, I don’t remember what happened next, all I remember is that I just stood there for a second. It’s strange that after 22 years, I can still remember that.

He doesn’t charge for his services!

After yesterday, I owe God a huge debt!!! Fortunately, he doesn’t charge for his miraculous services, because I would never be able to repay!!!
I woke up yesterday thinking and believing that British magistrate judge Baraitser would rule against Julian Assange, and in favor of his extradition. I expected that, right up until she started accepting the defense’s arguments. She pretty much rejected every single one right up until the point she started accepting them. Of course, she didn’t accept them until the very end of the case, like the pull the parachute, it’s time to get out, the plane is crashing end!!
She rejected all the witnesses the defense presented about whether Assange was conducting journalism, and/or encouraging a source. She said she believed that he conspired with Chelsea Manning to help crack a password, hint” I don’t!! She said that publishing the unredacted diplomatic cables was wrong. It only happened after the Guardian published the entire password in a book. She said that the impact on his family would be “ordinary.”
Baraitser started to change course, when it came to the medical evidence. She accepted that Assange had an episodic depressive disorder. She accepted that he’s on the autism spectrum. She also accepted that he’s a suicide risk. This was the moment when I said well at least Baraitser listened to some of the defense’s case. She also accepted that the conditions here, and the measures he would be held under, known as special administrative measures, would likely make his condition worse, and he’d have a single focus on ways to commit suicide. Hyper-focus is a symptom of ASD.
In the end, Baraitser ruled that “I find it would be unjust to extradite MR. Assange.” I’m pretty sure my heart stopped beating for who knows how long? It was at least a few seconds. When I read it again just to make sure, I let out the loudest scream I thought I could possibly get away with at just shy of 3 A.M. OF course the crown prosecutors representing the US said they’re going to appeal. Tomorrow morning, Baraitser will hear a request for a bail application, from Assange’s defense.